PAONCO
Epic Afghan Snowboarding
FNG: Man the Mountains here in Afghanistan are so beautiful...I'd love to come back here in a few years and snowboard those runs.
EOD: I wouldn't do that if I were you.
FNG: Why not? I'm sure once the violence calms down it'd be cool.
EOD: Most of those mountains are covered with landmines and UXO.
FNG: That would be EPIC!
Me: (SMH)
If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.
Robert Capa (via life)
This is what working in and teaching photography will do to you after a few years.

This is what working in and teaching photography will do to you after a few years.

Sage advice…a number of my compatriots left the military debt free and walked straight into medium sized publications or broadcast outlets while their peers were still struggling under crushing debt and fighting to get their foot in the door. The military ain’t for everyone but as a vocational training program it is damn hard to beat.

natashavc:

Here is my best advice to you, do not go to journalism school. Wait, my first best advice is go to Community College. Ok then go somewhere with a good public policy school, if you want to do journalism. You don’t need grad school. Your time would be better spent interning/working in a public…

todaysdocument:

Treating the wounds
During the North Vietnamese Army’s surprise 1968 Tet Offensive, a fierce battle raged in the city of Hue. Pitting North Vietnamese Army regulars and Vietcong against South Vietnamese Army troops and U.S. Marines, the month-long battle ended in defeat for the attackers. This photograph from February 6, 1968, shows D.R. Howe treating the wounds of Private First Class D.A. Crum.

Photograph of Soldiers at Hue City, 02/06/1968

todaysdocument:

Treating the wounds

During the North Vietnamese Army’s surprise 1968 Tet Offensive, a fierce battle raged in the city of Hue. Pitting North Vietnamese Army regulars and Vietcong against South Vietnamese Army troops and U.S. Marines, the month-long battle ended in defeat for the attackers. This photograph from February 6, 1968, shows D.R. Howe treating the wounds of Private First Class D.A. Crum.

Photograph of Soldiers at Hue City, 02/06/1968

I have no idea what the circumstances or events were that brought this photo into being but it is awesome!
frikimeme:

Noticia de primera mano

I have no idea what the circumstances or events were that brought this photo into being but it is awesome!

frikimeme:

Noticia de primera mano

Not how I teach folks to do it but this is often times how it turns out…

I work with journalist everyday in environments less than secure. While I don’t always agree with the coverage they provide or their interpretation of events, their bravery in the face of danger to pursue what they find to be the truth is something I always find inspiring. Conflict journalist and PAO Soldiers have different purposes but similar aims and for that reason I’ll take a moment out of my day, just as I do for fallen comrades, to remember Daniel Pearl. I didn’t know Pearl personally but I’ve known many like him and despite occasional differences and friendly irritations their purpose and mine are intertwined. As different as our jobs are, we are brought together in common purpose and willing to lay our lives on the line in our respective pursuits. R.I.P. Daniel Pearl and the many like him around the world. If you have a moment, visit the Newseum’s Journalist Memorial Wall in honor of those that sought to tell the story of conflict and died in their purpose. 
thepoliticalnotebook:

This week marks the ten year anniversary of the death of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal’s correspondent in South Asia, who was kidnapped and murdered in Pakistan in 2002. 
Read through the Wall Street Journal’s commemorative round-up of articles here. (Hat tip to Capital New York’s tumblr).
Here is an archived selection of some of Pearl’s front page stories.
And here are resources and information links about Daniel Pearl’s story and background via the South Asian Journalists Association.

I work with journalist everyday in environments less than secure. While I don’t always agree with the coverage they provide or their interpretation of events, their bravery in the face of danger to pursue what they find to be the truth is something I always find inspiring. Conflict journalist and PAO Soldiers have different purposes but similar aims and for that reason I’ll take a moment out of my day, just as I do for fallen comrades, to remember Daniel Pearl. I didn’t know Pearl personally but I’ve known many like him and despite occasional differences and friendly irritations their purpose and mine are intertwined. As different as our jobs are, we are brought together in common purpose and willing to lay our lives on the line in our respective pursuits. R.I.P. Daniel Pearl and the many like him around the world. If you have a moment, visit the Newseum’s Journalist Memorial Wall in honor of those that sought to tell the story of conflict and died in their purpose. 

thepoliticalnotebook:

This week marks the ten year anniversary of the death of Daniel Pearl, the Wall Street Journal’s correspondent in South Asia, who was kidnapped and murdered in Pakistan in 2002. 

Read through the Wall Street Journal’s commemorative round-up of articles here. (Hat tip to Capital New York’s tumblr).

Here is an archived selection of some of Pearl’s front page stories.

And here are resources and information links about Daniel Pearl’s story and background via the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 1972, Rolling Stone reporter Timothy Crouse followed around Apple, Broder and the rest of the Boys on the Bus, writing how the pack “began to believe the same rumors, subscribe to the same theories, and write the same stories.” In the evening, reporters would talk out the defining moment of that day, the key line, and file their stories often repeating that narrative for the next day’s edition of the Chicago Tribune or Baltimore Sun. With the exception of a few national agenda-setting publications, like the Times and Post, reporters on the campaign trail primarily wrote for their local audiences.


Now political reporters are usually writing for the world, and the pack has evolved into a hive, constantly buzzing with the latest updates from the trail published via iPhones and BlackBerrys.

Michael Calderone (via soupsoup)

PAONCO’s take:

Working in military Public Affairs is sometimes complicated because you are covering a lot of things that have national and international interest but your audience is often very local in nature. It is important to remember that the people you are covering and the events they are involved in matter most to people at a local level. Towns most people have never heard of like Killeen, TX, Waynesville, MO or Rapid City, SD are where we and our families live. These are the communities that we serve. So it doesn’t matter if the story is on the drawdown of troops in a war zone or a local training exercise, at the very basic level these are the audiences for which you should be writing. Keeping “local first” in mind will not only help you do better stories it will also help you accomplish your larger mission of keeping the public informed. 

This photo was taken by a guy I’m currently deployed with and is part of Business Insiders’ “45 Beautiful Photos Of The U.S. Military From The Last Year.” Click on the photo to see the rest of the feature.
Most of the photos in the feature were taken by military folks…either Public Affairs specialist or our cousins in the Combat Camera community. And this is just a very very very small sampling of the outstanding work our guys and gals do everyday. 

This photo was taken by a guy I’m currently deployed with and is part of Business Insiders’ “45 Beautiful Photos Of The U.S. Military From The Last Year.” Click on the photo to see the rest of the feature.

Most of the photos in the feature were taken by military folks…either Public Affairs specialist or our cousins in the Combat Camera community. And this is just a very very very small sampling of the outstanding work our guys and gals do everyday.